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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The JNC acknowledges the traditional custodians of the lands on which we work, the Gadigal and Bidjigal People of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging and acknowledge that these lands always were and always will be Aboriginal lands. We celebrate First Nations Peoples’ connection to the land and recognise the importance of Indigenous voices and culture. We would like to advise that there may be images or videos on this website of people who have since passed.

William Green

Chief of Police

A chief of police, also known as police chief or sometimes shortened to just chief, is the title typically given to the top official in the chain of command of a police department, particularly in North America. Alternate titles for this position include police commissioner, colonel (in the Rhode Island State Police), police superintendent, police president, and chief constable. In contrast to a sheriff (who is generally elected by the voters of a county, except in the states of Rhode Island and Hawaii), a chief of police is usually a municipal employee who owes his allegiance to a city or town. Some states have both an appointed and an elected chief of police (Louisiana). In some jurisdictions the head of the police commission is the leader of the police and holds a position analogous or similar to the one described here, in this case he is referred to as commissioner. The New York City Police Department has both a police commissioner and a chief, formerly called the chief inspector, now called the chief of department. In Louisiana, a chief of police may serve as the chief of police, marshal, and constable of a city. The fraternal organization International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) is an organization that many chiefs of police are associated with.